Hughes h1 japanese zero

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See our message to visitors. On September 13,Hughes achieved this design goal by flying the H-1 to a new world speed record of kilometers miles per hour at Santa Ana, California. Highlighted in this image is the Hughes H-1 racer being displayed in the Golden Age of Flight exhibition. Highlighted in this image are the propellers and engine of the Hughes H-1 racer. Highlighted in this image is the engine of the Hughes H-1 racer. This object is not on display at the National Air and Space Museum.

It is either on loan or in storage. Also known as the Hughes 1B, the H-1 was designed with two sets of wings: a short set with a span of 7. The aircraft as it is exhibited here is equipped with the long set. Hughes broke the transcontinental U.

hughes h1 japanese zero

His average speed for the 4,kilometer 2,mile flight was kilometers miles per hour. On September 13,Hughes achieved the design goal by flying the H-i to a new world speed record of The record was set over a specially instrumented course near Santa Ana, California. Since Hughes did not require a sponsor for the aircraft, the H-i had no markings except the license number NRY later NX Y in chrome yellow against the dark blue background of the wings, and in black against the doped aluminum rudder.

The fuselage was left in its natural polished aluminum finish. The H-i was powered by a Pratt and Whitney Twin Wasp Junior radial piston engine, which was rated at horsepower at 8, feet but which could deliver 1, horsepower for high-speed flight. Actual performance figures for the aircraft closely matched the predicted design performance. The H-1 had two sets of wings, The wings Hughes used to break the land plane speed record were of a low aspect ratio and shorter than those with which it is now fitted.

The wings now fitted on the aircraft span 31 feet, 9 inches. Hughes departed Los Angeles before dawn and arrived at Newark Airport, outside New York City, 7 hours, 28 minutes, and 25 seconds later.

His average speed over the 2,mile course was mph, and this nonstop flight was truly an outstanding accomplishment.

hughes h1 japanese zero

The Hughes H-1 was designed for record-setting purposes, but it also had an impact on the design of high-performance aircraft for years to come. It demonstrated that properly designed radial-engine aircraft could compete with the lower-drag inline designs despite having larger frontal areas because of their radial engine installations.His life and his accomplishments are somewhat of a mystery, and the H-1 is no exception. The history books only touch briefly on the H-1, an airplane that Hughes reportedly considered one of his greatest achievements.

After setting the transcontinental speed record inHoward Hughes would never again fly the H-1 Racer. The public would have to wait almost 65 years to see an H-1 fly again. That happened at A. The H-1 broke the world speed record at mile per hour, could fly from standard runways, had practical flight characteristics, and had an almost unimaginable range of nearly miles!

That was fast enough to capture the world record, and that was in ! Since the goal of the Racer Team was to recreate the aircraft as precisely as possible, the Team needed access to the original.

Using Paul Matt drawings of The Racer, estimates were made regarding fuselage and wing shape. Then reverse templates were cut using these estimates. The Smithsonian graciously allowed members of The Team access to the H-1 outside of normal business hours to make measurements. The reverse templates were held up to the actual H-1, and notes were made where they did not match. Several trips to Washington D. With each trip, the Racer Team gained new appreciation for the genius of Howard Hughes.

Whatever else Hughes may have been, his genius in aircraft design was becoming apparent. Hundreds of pictures were taken, and pages upon pages of notes were made. While this work was being done, hundreds of man-hours were spent in research. It seemed like everyone that had any knowledge of the original H-1 was eager to help.

They actually have documented history on each and every engine that they have built. Howard was anxious to work with Skip to obtain performance figures on the engine. At the time these were considered classified. According to Skip, Howard was directed to an office that by "sheer coincidence" had the performance figures laid open upon the desk. Howard was instructed to wait in the room while they reviewed his request for the data.

Skip's boss returned a short time later to inform Hughes that his request for the information was denied.

With a grin Hughes replied that he would no longer need it. Skip also recalled, with a chuckle that when Howard Hughes called him to discuss the data, that he called him collect. Skip asked his boss if he could accept collect calls to which his boss replied, "Only from Howard Hughes.The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below. This isn't right. You can't remove the stain of war from it.

Anymore than if he opened a concentration camp too, because it wasn't the camp's fault either. Tell that to other countries who still fly wwii planes and even perform mock battles. You know who those are. Correction, the sin rests with those whose ambition, greed, and dreams of conquest began a war that cost countless lives.

This is a business run by Mr. Ishizuka, who used to make top-quality sheepskin coats in New Zealand. That is some SPIN!! This is a perfect example of Japan's whitewashing. I have zero haha get it! Yes it was a fearsome plane when the war began, that being the invasion of China, latter Pearl Harbour and Singapore. Was soon obsolete and as the article states 10, built only 4 remain. Certainly not a survivable aircraft. But if it's all you have to feel good about, good luck to you. Visited a museum near Kagoshima some years ago, it had old aircraft there and was full of pictures and letters from the young men some aged 17 before their final flights.

Very moving and one had to admire their bravery, doing what they thought was the right thing.

Hughes´ H-1 and Zero

Toasted Heretic - the museum you visited was devoted to the Kamikaze pilots. And it totally misrepresents the reality; Young pilots had no choice in the matter. Cowardly officers put a paper in front of them to draw either an "0" accepting the mission or a "X" declining the mission. Those who declined suicide were thrust into constant combat missions sure to end in death at that stage in the war.

Those young pilots years old right out of training did not fly their planes at US warships shouting their devotion to the emperor. Most had to be held up in tears by ground crew just to get into the aircraft. Once in the air, they were actually escorted by other pilots to make sure they didn't abandon the mission. No different from a restored gun or any other weapon from the war in my opinion.

It's a nice looking airplane. Indeed the zero was an amazing fighter in the opening years of WWII. Pretty much outmaneuvered and outclassed anything we had at the time.Credit: High angled rear right side view of the Hughes H1 racer. The H-1 also known as the "Hughes 1B" model was the first product of the Hughes Aircraft firm and was intended as a world record-setting landplane from her modest beginnings.

The aircraft lived up to its billing and forged Hughes' name into aviation lore while at the same time becoming the last such non-military, record-setting aircraft to be constructed by an individual. The H-1 went on to set a world airspeed record and later captured the transcontinental speed record over the United States before the end of her tenure.

Odekirk was employed for the film by Hughes and charged with keeping the fleet of or so aircraft air-worthy. While production progressed, the two men began developing plans for a record-breaking aircraft design which eventually evolved to become the celebrated "H-1". Designs were on the drawing board as early as with promising wind tunnel tests following. Evaluation of a mock up proved enticing and development continued. Hughes H-1 Walk-Around Design of the H-1, credited to Richard Palmer and Hughes with construction credited to Odekirk, exuded speed from any one of her viewable angles.

She sported low-set monoplane wings with noticeable dihedral and each were made of wood attached to a tubular pencil like fuselage left as bare metal. The engine was held well-forward in the design and extended out ahead of the wings.

The cockpit was set well behind the wing assemblies and sported only light framing, allowing for unfettered views across the front and sides of the aircraft. The H-1 featured a short empennage capped by a single vertical tail fin complimented by applicable horizontal stabilizers.

The undercarriage consisted of two single-wheeled main landing gear legs and a hydraulically-controlled metal tail skid at the rear. The main legs retracted inwards towards the fuselage centerline. There were two sets of wings constructed to tackle two distinct flying modes - speed racing and cross-country racing. The Wings In its original configuration, the H-1 sported shorter wings of 25 feet and fielded in this fashion for setting the initial landplane speed record. These were indicated by their red paint coating.

'European Theater Flight' Planes of Fame airshow 2017

For the transcontinental record, the H-1 was then fitted with longer-spanning wings of 31 feet, 9 inches. These were indicated by their blue paint coating. Hughes - Always the Visionary Of particular note in the design of the H-1 were several revolutionary and key features to keep the "need for speed" criteria at the forefront. The H-1 made use of monoplane wings at a time when most aircraft even military types were still using biplanes with origins in a bygone era. The undercarriage's retractable nature was also a departure from conventional aircraft types then in use, many making due with static structures while others housed landing gear legs in streamlined, though fixed, fairings.The object at hand is silver and imperially slim, a fast and famous airplane.

And not merely fast and famous either, but probably the most beautiful airplane ever built. Its wings fair into the fuselage with such a smooth and gracious curve that you can almost feel the air just sliding by with no friction.

Init set the world record for landplanes—at the then astonishing speed of As sleek and gleaming as Brancusi's famous Bird in Space, the H-1 may represent a pure marriage of form and function. But like many valuable and worldly objects, it was a product of money and ambition. The man who both flew it to fame and was responsible for its creation was Howard Hughes.

In those innocent, far-off times Hughes was what was known as a "young sportsman. Hughes was a man with a lifelong penchant for films, fast planes and beautiful women.

Few begrudged him these preoccupations, even when his production of The Outlaw showed a good deal more of Jane Russell's facade than was then thought proper. But his private phobias about germs and secrecy were something else again.

To recent generations he is mainly known as the pitiful, paranoid billionaire he became, a terminally ill, grotesque recluse who tried to control vast holdings from beleaguered rooftop quarters in places like Las Vegas and Jamaica. He had a world-class gift for taking umbrage—and for giving it. He was brave, even foolhardy. His H-1 not only smashed records but broke new ground in aircraft design. He went on to pilot a standard, twin-ruddered and twin-engined Lockheed 14 around the world in a little more than 91 hours.

It was not only a world record but a pioneer flight that paved the way for the infant commercial airline services, one of which, TWA, he later owned and ran. From the moment Hughes decided to make Hell's Angels he became a passionate flier. During the actual filming, when his hired stunt pilots refused to try a chancy maneuver for the cameras, Hughes did it himself, crash-landing in the process.

He celebrated his 31st birthday by practicing touch-and-go landings in a Douglas DC In the early '30s Hughes had hired an ace aeronautical engineer named Richard Palmer and a skilled mechanic and production chief, Glenn Odekirk. In they set to work in a shed in Glendale, California. Hughes' aim was not only "to build the fastest plane in the world" but to produce something that might recommend itself to the Army Air Corps as a fast pursuit plane.

It was the right moment. Speed records had increased at a rate of about 15 mph a year sincewhen Brazilian pilot Alberto Santos-Dumont set the first record, in France, at A few planes were of bizarre design, like the Gee Bee Sportster, which resembled a fireplug with cupid wings. Some had outsize radial engines with cylinders set like spokes on a wheel. Others were pointy-nosed, like France's black Caudron racer with its sleek in-line engine. A Caudron set the speed record at In-line engines were more streamlined; radial engines ran cooler and gave less mechanical trouble.

It was a radial but small only 43 inches in diameterhoused in a long, bell-shaped cowling to cut down drag. In building the H-1, cutting down drag became a cause celebre. Its plywood-covered wings were short with a span of only 24 feet 5 inches and had been sanded and doped until they looked like glass. The thousands of rivets used on the surface of its aluminum monocoque fuselage were all countersunk, their heads partly sheered off and then burnished and polished to make a perfectly smooth skin.

Every screw used on the plane's surface was tightened so that the slot was exactly in line with the airstream.Log in or Sign up to interact with the community. Log in or Sign up. WWII Forums. What is the comment on this today? Did the Japanese copy H-1 or not?

hughes h1 japanese zero

Thanx for your answers! Kai-PetriJun 29, I'm puzzled. What are the similarities between the two machines?

Za RodinuJun 29, Joined: Oct 17, Messages: 3, Likes Received: That is a myth. To make a light weight racer into a carrier fighter would be more trouble than it is worth. You would have to rework everything in order to withstand the salt air, landing and take off stresses, weight of fuel, guns, ammo, bombs, drop tanks.

I think the Japanese were interested in the flush skin rivets and stressed skin wing and fuselage only. TAJun 29, Thanx TA! Howard himself seems to have thought they did copy his plane but then again Howard was saying alot of things Howard Hughes, in his own words.

Did Howard Hughes Design Japan’s Zero Fighter?

Kai-PetriJun 30, A similarity in planform geometry design doesn't have much to do with similarities in aerodynsmival and engineering design. What about flying surface sections, angles of incidence, dimensions, power setups, location of centres of pressure and gravity, structure design, fuel tank location, armament loads? The planes certainly had nothing in common bar the fact they both had wings, a radial engine and pretty little else.

Even less than the Space Shuttle and Buran, which beyond the superficial resemblace have nothing in common at all. Za RodinuJun 30, There is no relationship here. The Zero actually had a number of unique features in its structurial design that had not been previously seen in aircraft manufacture.

For example: The wing spars formed part of the skin of the wing rather than being skinned over as was normally done in aircraft construction. Mitsubishi made use of a new alloy of duraluminum copper - aluminum alloy that had a higher tensile strength. All skinning of the aircraft was carefully calculated to use the thinnest possible sheetmetal to save weight.

So, the skin thickness varied over the aircraft to a very great degree. Wing folding was foregone due to the weight involved. Mitsubishi did put in folding wingtips due only to the size of elevators on existing carriers. Even these were hotly debated on the weight issue again. The engine exhaust system was set up to add a little bit of thrust to the aircraft.

The tail wheel did not retract due again to the weight issue. Yes, the Zero did use flush rivets but, so did virtually every other aircraft that was contemporary in its construction.

GardnerJul 2, You must log in or sign up to reply here.Details Related. Model Hughes Aircraft Co. Physical Description Experimental, single engine, monoplane for air racing; wood wings with blue paint; yellow markings; bare aluminum fuselage. On September 13,Hughes achieved this design goal by flying the H-1 to a new world speed record of kilometers miles per hour at Santa Ana, California.

Also known as the Hughes 1B, the H-1 was designed with two sets of wings: a short set with a span of 7. The aircraft as it is exhibited here is equipped with the long set. Hughes broke the transcontinental U. His average speed for the 4,kilometer 2,mile flight was kilometers miles per hour. On September 13,Hughes achieved the design goal by flying the H-i to a new world speed record of The record was set over a specially instrumented course near Santa Ana, California.

Since Hughes did not require a sponsor for the aircraft, the H-i had no markings except the license number NRY later NX Y in chrome yellow against the dark blue background of the wings, and in black against the doped aluminum rudder.

The fuselage was left in its natural polished aluminum finish. The H-i was powered by a Pratt and Whitney Twin Wasp Junior radial piston engine, which was rated at horsepower at 8, feet but which could deliver 1, horsepower for high-speed flight.

Actual performance figures for the aircraft closely matched the predicted design performance. The H-1 had two sets of wings, The wings Hughes used to break the land plane speed record were of a low aspect ratio and shorter than those with which it is now fitted. The wings now fitted on the aircraft span 31 feet, 9 inches.

Hughes departed Los Angeles before dawn and arrived at Newark Airport, outside New York City, 7 hours, 28 minutes, and 25 seconds later. His average speed over the 2,mile course was mph, and this nonstop flight was truly an outstanding accomplishment. The Hughes H-1 was designed for record-setting purposes, but it also had an impact on the design of high-performance aircraft for years to come.

Mitsubishi A6M Reisen / ZEKE

It demonstrated that properly designed radial-engine aircraft could compete with the lower-drag inline designs despite having larger frontal areas because of their radial engine installations. Hughes also broke the transcontinental speed record in the H-1 in Credit Line Gift of the Summa Corp. Related Content.


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